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Who got the green card?

Ruminations at Flashback.


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5 § Information that's turned over to the police by signals intelligence according to 2 § of law 2000:130 concerning defence intelligence operations shall be turned over to the security police or the federal police. If the information is of value to a preliminary criminal investigation, it may also be turned over to the local police authority in charge of the investigation.
 - Swedish law proposal 'SOU 2009:66' from 2009

'But you plugged the leak. Assange's star has fallen. I must say you did a good job.'
'It wasn't us. It was the yanks with their local network in our country, together with former SSI chief Chris Loklinth of course. They planted evidence.'
'Yeah well I know that. How many CIA agents are there in Sweden?'
'I wish I knew. Lots. Above all they have heaps of individuals who support them on purely ideological grounds. People who are tired of socialism. They're glad to help for a green card and a well paid position in New York or Washington.'
'Such as fucking the enemies of the US?'
'I didn't say that.'
'No not you.'
 - The Bilderberg Meeting, a novel by former Swedish spy Anders Jallai


trenterx:

The same day he was arrested in absentia, once the preliminary investigation was underway, tapping Assange's phones was totally legal. So in other words it was highly practical to have him under arrest.

We can without hesitation assume that both signals surveillance agency FRA and the secret police SÄPO had their eyes on WikiLeaks and Julian Assange already before he came here and was arrested in absentia. Surveillance of Assange must have been part of FRA's agreement with the US. The question is whether FRA supplied data in realtime to those who were shadowing Assange when he came here in August 2010, for example supplied it to the US embassy. Having this data in realtime opens the door to greater possibilities to influence the outcome of events before the police complaint is filed.

Back in August 2010 FRA weren't permitted to share intelligence with SÄPO, but that was mostly a formality only. A new law that permitted it was already on the table of the parliament - see SOU 2009:66 from 2009, page 31.

It's likely that FRA supplied the SMS traffic with Julian Assange, Anna Ardin, Sofia Wilén, Donald Boström, Johannes Wahlström and others to the security police or another agency. The question is whether this began already the week before the police case was opened, and what in such case the security police did at that point.

duqu:

As I wrote earlier, Expressen knew Julian and Sofia were out walking on the town together and visited her place of work and they even published a timeline, and not even Johannes Wahlström knew what they were up to. So who gave that information to the tabloid?

trenterx:

Assange's talk must have attracted individuals who were tasked with monitoring his movements. Then there were at least five people who marched off to the lunch restaurant.

[At least six: Assange, Weiderud, Boström, Wahlström, Ardin, Wilén. Ed.]

It would have been easy to tail them. And then Julian and Sofia went to the natural history museum.

[After visiting the Haymarket with Wahlström. Ed.]

Any reasonably clever journalist, policeman, or lay person could have followed them. It would have been even easier if there'd been several involved.

Conclusion: Expressen's reporters either followed Assange themselves or else they have extraordinarily good contacts with the police and intel agencies. Or both.

Kungsgatan36:

That the US would not use every resource at their disposal to monitor someone they see as a terrorist on a par with al Qaeda is out of the question. It's unthinkable. Especially as this person was on his way to creating a new base of operations in Sweden, a base which would have made him even better protected and yet more dangerous. (And of course this was a nightmare scenario for Sweden - granting haven to the worst enemy of your foremost ally. This could not be allowed to happen.)

Of course every step Assange took in Sweden was closely watched, as were all his contacts, all his communications, as they tried to find a single weak spot where they could attack. (And if that didn't work, they'd just move to plan B and plan C.) Most likely they found the weak spot in the HIV phobia of one of the coming complainants. All they needed then was to send off an anonymous SMS message saying that Assange was thought to be HIV-positive, and then a few instructions about how Swedes should manage the chain reaction they'd have started.

The question of what Swedish laws limited the activities of the US is totally irrelevant. Assange was to be stopped at all costs. One doesn't worry about the niceties of law in such situations. And the motive for stopping Assange was as strong for Sweden as it was for the US. The US contributed the needed resources, and Sweden gave the needed consent.

trenterx:

Anders Jallai, who himself worked in the intel sector, has a comment on the Assange case buried in his new thriller 'The Bilderberg Meeting' in chapter 35. The main character Anton Modin is talking to Göran Filipsson, head of the secret section of military intelligence known as SSI.

'But you plugged the leak. Assange's star has fallen. I must say you did a good job.'
'It wasn't us. It was the yanks with their local network in our country, together with former SSI chief Chris Loklinth of course. They planted evidence.'
'Yeah well I know that. How many CIA agents are there in Sweden?'
'I wish I knew. Lots. Above all they have heaps of individuals who support them on purely ideological grounds. People who are tired of socialism. They're glad to help for a green card and a well paid position in New York or Washington.'
'Such as fucking the enemies of the US?'
'I didn't say that.'
'No not you.'


Jallai's little chat about the Assange case is buried deep in a thriller about something else entirely. He's done this before - last time he had Marianne Ny in his sights. This is his way of hinting at things he knows or suspects.

The day after the arrest in absentia of Julian Assange on suspicion of rape, Jallai published an article at Newsmill where he cautioned that the entire affair could be a Swedish security police honeytrap. From what's written in his new book, it appears he's changed his mine somewhat. 'It was the yanks with their local network in our country, together with former SSI chief Chris Loklinth of course. They planted evidence.' The name Chris Loklinth is a variant of Christer Lokind, former head of SSI and officially a part of the signals intelligence agency FRA and the military intelligence agency MUST.

BaalZeBub:

So who got the green card? AA? SW?

longbow4y:

It's swung back and forth but today everything points to SW.

And when AA finally realises what's been going on, there's going to be a sound and a fury.

I'm so sick of it all. Will it never end? At any rate I want to say the other girl's just as much to blame.
 - Anna Ardin

Apparently Swedish laws are unique. If you have a penis you're half a rapist before you even get through customs.
 - Scott Adams

If I am able to reveal what I know, everyone will realise this is all a charade. If I could tell the British courts, I suspect it would make extradition a moot point.
 - Björn Hurtig

I can tell you that the Swedish prosecution still hasn't provided copies of those SMS texts that have been referred to. Those texts are some of the most powerful exculpatory evidence. In Australia prosecutors have a very grave duty to disclose such evidence to courts when seeking the grave exercise of a court's power against an individual. Yet in Sweden in this case, in the first hearings to obtain an arrest warrant, those texts were not submitted to the Swedish court, which is highly improper.
 - James Catlin

The prosecutor could achieve this broadening of the law during Assange's trial so he can be convicted of a crime that didn't exist at the time he allegedly committed it. She would need to. There is no precedent for this. The Swedes are making it up as they go along.
 - James Catlin

Julian Assange will surely learn that considering what WikiLeaks has published, he's got a few enemies in the Pentagon, the CIA, and the White House. Sweden began an investigation into rape which was later dismissed. Assange was even denied residence in Sweden. One can only speculate to what extent the security agencies of the US were involved. And considering the obvious interest of the US to silence WikiLeaks, is it likely Assange will have an accident of the 'Boston brakes' kind in the coming years? Or will he be snared with compromising information of the 'honey trap' kind?
 - 'Drozd' at Flashback 23 October 2010

The truth will out, the truth wins out. Let no journalist ever again speculate into what the protocols say. Six months of digging and the people at Flashback have the actual documents. The sleaze printed by rags such as the Daily Mail, Sweden's Aftonbladet and Expressen, and perhaps above all the toxic Nick Davies of the Guardian, can stand no more. Yet more: these documents are an indictment of the 'news organisations' who've printed deliberate inaccuracies all along or even worse: refused to print anything at all. Nick Davies' account of the protocols was maliciously skewed; both Aftonbladet and Expressen had copies early on and printed nothing. Bloggers had copies but arrogantly kept the information to their Smeagol selves.
 - The Assange Police Protocol: Translator's Note

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