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Assange & WikiLeaks June-July 2015

The genii's got out of the bottle.


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So Marianne Ny's supposed to be headed to London soon. To interrogate Julian Assange. Actually not Marianne Ny herself, but an assistant.

This took only five years. Or thereabouts. The standoff in the embassy has been ongoing since 2012. That's a lot of time to stay indoors. Once upon a time, there was supposedly no legal way to question Assange outside Sweden; then it wasn't illegal anymore but only 'inappropriate' for some unpecified reason; then it was... and then... To put it mildly, the machinations of this 'prosecutor' in dealing with the case have been mystifying.

And one must remember that Marianne Ny got involved only because of the intervention of Claes Borgström. And then one must recall who Claes Borgström is: the most disgraced (some say 'crooked') practitioner of law in the history of the country.

Be that as it may: this case has distracted from the work of WikiLeaks, and it's that work which is the pivotal event in recent world history. Julian Assange rather literally invented the electronic equivalent of the 'brown envelope', with all that entails; in one fell swoop he changed the course of human history.

Things like this always look easier in the rear view mirror. The technology was there, or at least evolving to that point. All it needed was someone to put it all together. That someone was Julian Assange.

Remember how much Xerox copying Daniel Ellsberg had to do? All those hundreds of thousands of documents released by WikiLeaks could today be transferred in a few short moments, often ported from location A to location B on a USB thumb, a thumb that fits - for example - under the collar of a polo jumper...

The plain, simple, and irrevocable truth of the matter is that it's finally time to print the long-awaited obituary for mass organised corruption. Because blowing the whistle on bastards has never before been this easy, this safe, or - some would say - this much fun.

The intemperate will cite Bradley (Chelsea) Manning or Edward Snowden or others who seem to have been caught in the web of the powers that be, despite the safety of the new WikiLeaks electronic 'brown envelope'. But there's nothing wrong with that envelope - it works fine, thank you. Indiscretions on the part of sources - or deliberate outing - are behind all such cases out there today. Think instead of the myriad leakers whose identities are not known, even today, and most likely will never be known. This is the strength of the idea, an idea whose time has come.

The WikiLeaks website today has a submission system again, likely more formidable than ever, the product of years of further research, a new system that ostensibly takes into account how the terrain and technology itself have changed in the past five years. Knowing what we know today about the NSA - things we mostly only suspected before Snowden's leaks - it becomes obvious that everyone is a target, and that it's therefore necessary to lose even the whistleblower traffic like a 'needle in a stack of needles', as Tom Hanks once put it. The new submission system is rolling right along, there's a flood of new releases all the time again, and there's no sign of it letting up. On the contrary: now that people of conscience and dignity again realise that their objectives are only a Tor browser install and a mouse click away, things can be expected to speed up considerably. The only bottleneck here seems to be the speed at which overworked staff can process and sanitise the torrent of input. Whistleblowers again have an instance of last resort, beyond and above all the makeshift (sometimes outright dangerous) copycat sites sprouting up these past years.

WikiLeaks gave us all a shocker in 2010. Or two shockers. Or three. Or more. The Collateral Murder video, horrific enough in itself, was a carrier wave for an even more horrific message - namely that our trusted powers that be were actually lying to us. Lying to us systematically. The followup, the Afghan War Diaries, was the single biggest release ever. The impact was overwhelming. Naturally the powers that be did all they could to contaminate the narrative. But no one yet knew how even that release would be dwarfed in the months ahead.

Those releases of 2010 were fortuitously planned. October saw the Iraqi War Logs hit the media. It might be difficult to remember the extent of the media impact: AJE had televised special broadcasts, the Guardian had huge full page spreads going on page after page. Saturation was total. People everywhere could see - in black on white, online and on their television screens - what their governments, their duly elected representatives, had really been up to. Doctors who referred unstable children to terrorists to thereafter be groomed into suicide bombers; US grunts who, on orders 'from above', mowed down (murdered) civilian families they knew to be 'innocent'. The world at large began to grasp the true ugliness of war, something those powers that be wanted to keep from us.

What were they doing? Why all this horrific killing, destruction? Our news had been oh so carefully and lovingly sanitised; WikiLeaks brought home the ugly bitter truth, helped to 'set us free'. And now we're all free, in one way of thinking. We can (more or less) openly discuss these matters on social media. We can exchange tidbits of information, pass on important links - links, for that matter, that mostly do not come from journalists in the MSM but from accredited journalists who are brave (and honest) enough to work outside the MSM so they can give us the real truth.

And then the cherry on the multilayer cake: Cablegate. After suffering the 'slings and arrows' of the US government media machine, WikiLeaks released hundreds of thousands of diplomatic dispatches that showed us in embarrassing detail how those duly elected representatives really worked, what they really thought of us, of themselves, of the other leaders they confronted. Trying to get DNA from the UN; trying to dig into the private life of Cristina Kirchner; all of this in a stream of shocker after shocker.

And where had our MSM been through all this? Silenced like mockingbirds? Political blackouts?

From Borscht...

The crisis in Ukraine served as a glittering example of just how bad the MSM had become. We know today about Operation Mockingbird, and we understand all too well that this CIA op, purportedly closed down by George HW Bush back in the 1970s, was never closed down at all. We learned that no less than Ben Bradlee and Katherine Graham were part of the operation, as were media celebrities from around the world. Thankfully we learned to trust one another instead, and to never again trust that turncoat MSM.

Of late the MSM have been forced to come around when it comes to Ukraine, for we are now told - almost told at any rate - that the US gambit in Ukraine is part of a diabolic scenario sketched out decades earlier by someone from Galicia, and that today the US succeeded in establishing and supporting the only USDA prime-time truly authentic Nazi putsch since the second world war - since the end of that diabolic era when such things were supposedly eradicated once and for all.

But they were not eradicated. The vestiges of Nazism in western Ukraine, a mirror of what went on in Bavaria in the 1930s, were instead cultivated by the US government, a government who didn't share the ethics of the rest of us. Getting Werner von Braun out of Germany may have been one thing; but open support of Nazi butchers was quite another.

The Ukraine crisis is but one example of what's going on all over the world. As Julian Assange himself once reflected, it's no longer the left pitted against the right - it's the individual against the corrupt organisation. And conspiracy blooms (festers) almost anywhere there's no public insight. One needs public outrage to clamp down on conspiracy, as was astutely pointed out in 'When Google Met WikiLeaks'. From Sweden's 'closed door' trials to Bilderberg to G8 G7, it's all about secrecy. And those secrets are things the 'bastards' of the world don't want to get out. For obvious reasons. And it's precisely for that reason they have to get out. And they will get out.

... To Trans-Pacific Alphabet Soup

A great fruit of the electronic brown envelope is the recent series of disclosures regarding a number of super-secretive trade agreements, so secretive that the texts aren't supposed to be made public until five years after they've passed into law! Think about that one. Then thank your lucky stars that Julian Assange can still operate, despite his less than ideal circumstances.

Going Forward

Julian Assange has been trying to get his Swedish case resolved for years. It's not so he can vacate the Ecuador embassy and make his way to the Americas and to a beach on the Pacific Ocean. It's not to avoid a prison sentence in Scandinavia - he's already been a prisoner far longer than if he'd seen the inside of a Guide Michelin Swedish prison cell.

It's because the case itself jeopardises the reputation of his organisation and thereby hampers its work. As he once said right before flying to the US to announce the Collateral Murder video: 'I'm in a hurry - I have a couple of wars to end'.

There is no alternative: history will move in this direction. Call it dialectic materialism if you must, but admit that it's inevitable. Governments won't be able to get away with murder anymore. Greed will finally be reined in. Universal respect for human rights shall prevail. The genii's got out of the bottle - it can't be put back in ever again.

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